It’s exciting times for women in football. The women’ s game is the biggest source of growth, and women are a rich untapped talent pool off the field.

As football reforms, our voices are starting to be heard – but we all know there is still so far to go before equality becomes a reality.

And it’s not easy. The institutions and culture of football need to be beDer geared to unleash the high growth potential of the women’s game, and enable women to contribute and advance professionally.

We need a movement that represents the interests of women, and the women’s game, as its #1 priority.

Football Women International will connect us globally from all parts of the game. It will give us a platform to collaborate and a collective voice to advocate for women and influence football’s decision-makers.

Who we are

Women who love football and believe gender equality can not only positively change the culture of football, but also drive performance of football bodies around the world. We are:

  • Players from all over the world, including current and former women’s national team members, and some of the most prominent names in the women’s  and men’s game.
  • Coaches, referees, and team staff, including the highest achievers in the game
  • Prominent lawyers, executives, administrators and media involved in the men’s and women’s game – who wish to help advance gender equality in football and the development of women’s football globally

Our Core Values

1. WE BRING VALUE
Women bring value, growth and balance to football.

2. WE HAVE THE RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE
Gender inclusion in football is a matter of human rights. Girls and women must be given participation opportunities equal to those of boys and men at each stage of their football journey, both on and off the field, in all facets of football. This may require special measures such as targets, quotas and monitoring. Meaningful remedies must be available to ensure human rights are honoured.

3. WE MUST BE INCLUDED IN DECISION-MAKING
Diversity improves decision-making. Football’s stakeholders and institutions must take active steps towards achieving a minimum 30% gender balance in all decision-making bodies, in all aspects of the game. Governance mechanisms must be adjusted to promote these positive outcomes.

4. GENDER DISCRIMINATION AND BIAS MUST BE RECOGNISED AND CHALLENGED
Gender discrimination is widely present in football and must be recognised and addressed, including through gender audits and workable mechanisms for remedy, reform and reconciliation. Systemic and unconscious bias must be called out and challenged. Victims of discrimination must be supported to challenge bias and facilitate change.

5. WOMEN MUST BE EMPOWERED TO LEAD
Women must be empowered to assume positions of leadership & authority, including those at the field of play such as coaching, refereeing, medical and technical roles, as well as those in commercial, administrative and governance roles. Barriers must be recognised and removed, to ensure that women can advance on a proper merits basis across both women’s and men’s football.

6. WOMEN’S FOOTBALL MUST BE FAIRLY RESOURCED
Football stakeholders must increase their investment in opportunities for women and girls, until resourcing is demonstrably proportionate to female participation and potential. A key focus should be the provision of female-friendly opportunities that will deliver substantial improvements in the short to medium term.

7. WOMEN MUST BE EMPOWERED TO GUIDE WOMEN’S FOOTBALL
Women with expertise in and commitment to the women’s game should participate in, and preferably guide, decision-making in women’s football, including allocation of funds, competitions, player development, coach/referee development and appointments, marketing, and national team programs.

8. WOMEN’S FOOTBALL SHOULD BE DEVELOPED TO BE THE BIGGEST WOMEN’S SPORT IN THE WORLD
The women’s game must be nurtured towards professionalism, with sound commercial strategies, with the goal of making football the biggest women’s sport in the world by participation, audience and revenues. All football stakeholders – including governing bodies, clubs, leagues, sponsors, media partners, investors, players, coaches, referees and fans – should join this journey, bringing the focus, respect, commitment & investment required to succeed, while acknowledging that women’s football will evolve differently to men’s to optimize and accelerate development.

9. WELL-BEING AND PROTECTION FOR FEMALES IN FOOTBALL MUST BE IMPROVED
Women and girls are vulnerable in society, and football is no exception. We must be protected from harassment, abuse and medical neglect by appropriate standards of conduct and child protection, with meaningful enforcement, across all football stakeholders. Medical research and expertise on female athletes must be improved so that women can enjoy safe participation.

10. FOOTBALL MUST PROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY IN SOCIETY
Because women are disadvantaged in society (e.g. by the gender pay gap and gender-based violence) sporting organisations must use their considerable influence to bring about improved social outcomes for women, and for the societies they live in.

Our Leadership

Moya Dodd

Moya Dodd

Former vice-captain of Australia and one of the first 3 women on the FIFA Council. Led the #womeninFIFA movement for gender equality reforms. Serves on the AFC Executive Committee, Legal Committee and chairs the AFC Women’s Football Committee. Member of the International Council of Arbitration for Sport (ICAS). Winner of an IOC Women in Sport Award, 2016. Lawyer, MBA

Mary Harvey

FIFA Women’s World Cup 1991 Champion and 1996 Olympic Gold Medalist. 17 years in football governance, including posts at FIFA (Director of Development), US Soccer (board member, executive committee, founder, Athlete’s Council), Women’s Professional Soccer (Chief Operating Officer), Women’s World Cup USA 1999 and World Cup USA 1994 Organizing Committees. Co-conspirator in #WomeninFIFA movement. Graduate in Finance, MBA, Management Consultant.

Ebru Koksal

Ebru Koksal CFA

Finance industry professional with 17 years experience in football governance, including GM and Board Member of Galatasaray. First woman elected to the Executive Board of the European Clubs Association, and served as General Secretary of the Turkish Football Association. Winner of Stadium Business Executive of the Year Award in 2011. FIFA and UEFA consultant and leadership mentor. Scottish FA Equality and Diversity Advisory Board Member. Graduate in Economics and International Relations from Brown University and Advanced Management from Harvard Business School.